The Rise and Fall of Abstract Art

Composition (№1) Gray-Red (1935) by Piet Mondrian. Oil on canvas. 57.5 × 55.6 cm. Chicago Institute of Art, U.S. Image source Chicago Institute of Art (open access)

When, in the late 19th century, artists began to move away from naturalistic representations of the world, a new idealism in art emerged.

Many artists, including Piet Mondrian, who painted Composition (№1) Gray-Red in 1935 (above), believed that abstract art could be instrumental in a more harmonious society…

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Art writer, critic, novelist, artist. See my links at https://linktr.ee/cpjones

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Christopher P Jones

Christopher P Jones

Art writer, critic, novelist, artist. See my links at https://linktr.ee/cpjones

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